Process Video: Cerulean Sea

You might remember a month or so ago, when I was prepping for the “Life’s a Beach” show at the local gallery, and I painted a piece I named “Sea Foam.” While I was working on it, I knew I had to give it a much larger, “sister” painting. Not long after the beachy-themed show began, I picked up a large sheet of Arches paper from the hobby store and headed home to get it prepped. Continue reading “Process Video: Cerulean Sea”

Painting With Nature

The bottom left-hand texture of this painting was created with leaves

I started my Wednesday morning with some hot coffee, a Bobby Darin record, and watercolor videos. A few of them were more meditative, which reminded me of how much I myself love this technique. Meditative art–or at least my definition of it–is when you paint/create with having no idea what you are going to come up with. You start with one or two colors, one brush, and just, go with the flow.

See what I did there?

Meditative painting is how I’ve been filling my Wordless Diary, as it is a great way to get my thoughts/feelings down onto paper, without trying to put what said thoughts/feelings are into words. I often feel better after finishing a wordless entry, than I do after writing two pages of whiny nonsense.

Wordless Diary Entries

I’ve been feeling a bit meh lately, and so I decided I needed a good meditative/wordless session. And as I was filling an empty cherry jar with water, I noticed Goo’s flowers from her recital by the window. One of the roses had wilted, and the loose petals were just begging to be plucked. I took a few, along with two or three tiny leaves. My goal was to stamp their patterns into the painting somehow.

The first painting was a major flop–as the first painting tends to be, because I’m “clearing the cobwebs” so to speak–but the next painting flowed together much nicer. I switched between watercolors and pens. I just let my brain wander, and refused to worry about whether or not I was going to produce something extraordinary.

Tip: when doing a meditative painting like this, using scrap paper helps keep you worry-free

Flowers painted with rose petals and gouache

The leaves made pretty “stone” textures at the base of my hills, making me think of a rocky cliffside by the sea. The rose, however, didn’t do much. It was much too soft to paint wet-in-wet with, and even placing something heavy on top of it didn’t leave an imprint. I decided that once the painting was finished, I would try a bit of wet-on-dry with gouache. And it worked nicely!

I have used bits of foliage here and there in previous paintings, but I think I’ll start a whole collection of natural tools. Rocks, sticks, dead flowers, to name a few. Should be fun!

Materials Used:

Daniel Smith watercolors (indigo and Aussie red gold)

-Brea Reese watercolor in (lake blue and pink)

-Winsor & Newton Designer’s Gouache (white)

-Scrap cold press paper

-Mixed media paper

 

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All images/videos ©Lina Forrester

Where the Witch Lives

Not all witches are bad, have crazy eyes and warty noses. In fact, the witch who lives in this house, though very introverted, is kind and cheerful. She keeps to herself, tending to her garden, the plants in which provide endless hours of alchemy practice in her study.

I like to think she uses flower petals and beet roots to dye fabric, which she later sews to make hardy dresses and quilts. And her cat isn’t black, but orange, with big bright green eyes that match the dried basil in her herb collection.

This piece was one of my “go with the flow” paintings, meaning I didn’t know what I was going to paint until it began to take shape on the paper. Contrary to what I usually do, which is paint on a flat surface, I used my easel set at around an 80 degree angle so that the watercolor would flow downward. I also used a wet on wet technique, only letting it dry at the very end, when I wanted to paint in some finer details.

Here is a timelapse of the painting process. Unfortunately, my phone died toward the end, so a good chunk of the video never saved. But I hope it’s enough for you to see how it all came together.

Materials used:

-Daniel Smith watercolors (moonglow, indigo, rare green earth, hansa yellow medium, and raw/burnt umber)

-Arches cold press 140lb

-Princeton brushes

Both the original and the print of this piece are available on my Etsy shop.

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All images/videos © Lina Forrester

Aussie Red Gold

When I saw Jean Lurssen using Aussie Red Gold in one of her YouTube videos, I knew it was going to be the next color on my list. But Daniel Smith watercolors are not cheap (this one was around 15$ for a tube) and so it remained on my wishlist for a month or two, until I found the means to splurge.

And wow this color rocks!

I think what I like most about this color is its warmness. I have a lot of cool yellows, but I’ve always gravitated toward my Woodlands palette for the warmer yellows and oranges.

So far I’ve only been playing with this color, testing its limits, but I do have a few ideas brewing of sunrises and golden autumns and sunflowers.

This morning, I shot a timelapse of my play, in which I mixed the new color with my other Daniel Smith watercolors, and then splashed around on a scrap piece of paper.

These are the colors I mixed on the video in order:

-Perylene Red

-Hansa Yellow Medium

-Yellow Ochre

-Raw Umber

-Burnt Umber

-Payne’s Gray

-Rare Green Earth

-Prussian Blue

-Ultramarine Blue

-Indigo

-Moonglow

My favorite mix of these was probably the pretty green I got with prussian blue, but I did enjoy the neutrals I got as well, with moonglow and ultramarine blue.

I’m not sure what my next color will be. As of right now, I’m pretty set, and the only thing I may need to buy soon is another primary set, as I’m low on those three colors. But you can be sure that when I buy a new color, I will definitely write all about it on here!

Until next time!

-Lina

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